Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger... boy culture: BLOGS

64 posts categorized "BLOGS"

Jun 08 2017
Happy 10! Comments (0)

Unnamed(Image by Sergio Cyrillo/Cia 11 Estúdio for pop ao cubo)

Brazilian blog pop ao cubo is turning 10 with this shoot of model Samuel Oliveira. More here.

Congrats!

 
Feb 28 2017
Comfy Culture: Queerty Offers 10 Queer Movies To Get You Through The Trump Years Comments (0)

TblNUYn(GIF via NeoFight Film)

Lovely that David Reddish, writing for Queerty, has included Boy Culture (2006) in his list of “10 comforting queer flicks to soothe the soul in a discomforting time.”

Many people don't realize I wrote a novel called Boy Culture that later became a movie, a movie I helped promote by launching this blog.

Reddish writes:

Q. Alan Brocka directed this adaptation of Matthew Rettenmund’s novel about a hooker with a heart of gold. Boy Culture doesn’t play like the gay version of Pretty Woman, however. In fact, it smashes the Cinderella nonsense of that film precisely by introducing a set of realistic characters, led by X. As played by Derek Magyar, X makes no apology for his questionable line of work. On the contrary, he seems to feel more shame for being part of a love triangle with his two hottie roommates, Andrew and Gregory. With a multi-racial cast and a melancholy backdrop of Seattle, Boy Culture unfolds less as a gay film about sex than a thoughtful drama about finding love in an oversexed world. For a queer audience, Boy Culture surpasses the fairytale silliness of most romantic comedies—gay or straight themed—with believable characters and some real introspection.

Time for a sequel.

 
Dec 30 2016
Start With Why Not: TED Talk Speaker Explains The Millennials' Biggest Obstacles Comments (0)

Above is the most insightful and aggressive part of author and TED speaker and Start with Why author Simon Sinek's  (great primer on him here) September 2016 interview with Inside Quest's Tom Bilyeu. He is expressing his thoughts on what's wrong with millennials — a BookLeft1controversial premise — but is doing so in a way that is, if nothing else, empathetic and thoughtful, and that attempts to offer some fixes for the future. (The title on the FB embed is rather insulting; ignore that.)

I think he makes some great points, including the oft-repeated conservative talking point (which does not mean it's automatically wrong) that kids who are told they're special and can have anything they want and get participation medals are being done a disservice. I, too, worry about the implied promise in such things; I have never responded well to people saying dreams come true, even though I have understood it to mean that dreams (can, sometimes) come true.

He loses me a bit by characterizing the entire generation as having been failed by their parents. That is extreme. A new parenting strategy that he suggests is failing is not the same as having overall bad parenting.

Where he strikes paydirt is in discussing the downside of our innovations that have led to the expectation of immediacy — in other words, put down the cellphone. (How?!) It's hard for us because — as has been scientifically proven — social media and texts and such trigger dopamine bursts in our brains, meaning they're all potential addictions.

Where he loses me a bit is the idea that if social media/cellphones are same/same as drugs, alcohol and gambling, that means we have only one new addiction to deal with; all those other generations before had three, and new generations have four. Is that one extra addiction powerful enough that it should be blamed for leading to the tipping point? Or is he suggesting this addiction is far worse than all that have come before? I guess he doesn't lose me there so much as I think it's glossed over.

I'd also like to ask him if he thinks the advent of social media/cellphones is not actually affecting people born well before 1984. As someone born in the '60s, I think I have actually lost some of my better attributes due to that addiction, even though I was raised with them (I, too, hate seeing that a video will run 14 minutes when I click on it, I now despise writing in longhand and my blog/cellphone/social media preoccupations certainly have affected relationships and productivity. I have a great novel that's been cooking in my so long Herman Melville could have written it out on onion paper in the time I've spent thinking on it and escaping it via Internet self-medication.

I do think it's insanity to suggest leaving your house without your cellphone, even if you're going to dinner with friends. That's why we have cellphones, to have portable contactability. What if there is an emergency? I think we can leave them in our pockets and check before and after a fully engaged meal.

All that said, it's food for thought, and it doesn't come from a place of saying that millennials are assholes and we're better than them and fuck them.

Watch the full hour after the jump. If that feels like a loooooot of tiiiiiiime, you may have a problem ...

 Read More

 
Dec 17 2016
6-PACK — Bye, Fella-licia + Obama Blames Putin, Imagines Reagan Spinning + NEWSWEEK Scribe Given Seizure By Deplorable + BMXXXer + His Justin Vivian Bond Is His Word + Hand-Jive Talkin'! Comments (0)

WIDGETSean Mandell is leaving Towleroad — sob!

WIDGETObama's last 2016 presser: Press to blame for taking Putin's leak bait, but yeah, it was Putin. I prefer Mamie's take:

WIDGETNewsweek's Kurt Eichenwald has Trump's number, so people are tweeting him strobe images to trigger his epilepsy.

Screen Shot 2016-12-16 at 11.27.26 PM(Image via Instagram @willgrant)

WIDGETWill Grant, BMXer-cum-model, goes nude. (Work Unfriendly)

WIDGETHe's with v: Review of Justin Vivian Bond's new Christmas cabaret act.

Screen Shot 2016-12-16 at 11.31.22 PM(Video still via John-David Lyons)

WIDGETThank God for the (Really) Gay Men's Chorus of San Diego. Watch how they were born to hand-jive AFTER THE JUMP ...

 Read More

 
Nov 05 2016
BOY CULTURE Turns 11 Comments (0)

IMG_4503Guy, with iPhone—why not take all of me??? (Image by Matthew Rettenmund)

Today is my blog's 11th anniversary.

I never dreamed I'd make it another year after 10, and it's been a rough year, blog-wise, behind the scenes. I feel like the blog has solid content lately, though, and I'll definitely keep it going as I continue to see through a major project in the next six months.

But while I pour a lot of myself into the blog, it can't last forever. It's such a time drain for the money I get back, even if it also gives me a lot of pleasure. And free theater tickets.

I welcome any constructive input on what could make it better in the comments below—and FYI, I'm considering a cosmetic overhaul, too.

Of the blog, not of me, though I could use more hair (on my head) and a few other tuneups.

Happy birthday, Boy Culture!

Check out last year's collection of favorite posts here.

 
Sep 14 2016
Wicked Makeover! Comments (0)

Screen Shot 2016-09-14 at 11.01.15 AM(Image via Wicked)

Wicked has a new look, but why not start with a post showing a dude in tightie whities assuming the position?

 
Aug 29 2016
Boys Don't Cry: On Gay Blogs Covering Frank Ocean, Other Gay Artists & Hot Straight Guys Comments (0)

Esquire, not exactly known for its stake in LGBT visibility and rights, tweeted this catty jab at gay blogs, piggybacking on the recent criticism that gay blogs had not been covering Frank Ocean enough, even though he is an out artist, and on complaints of “gay-baiting” from stars like the Jonases.

The insult is that gay blogs cover straight artists to the exclusion of gay artists, either out of some sort of lack of consideration for GULP our own kind, or maybe because Frank Ocean is black, which of course picks another fight, a diversity fight.

We don't need a non-LGBTQ website/social media outfit run by a massive corporation that can pick and choose what it wants to cover (and by the way, is not forbidden from covering gay artists themselves) wading into the fray and attempting to needle gay people on a sensitive topic just so they can get some people riled up on Twitter when they couldn't give two f*cks about the issue beyond the depth of those few characters.

1471884724160819_Frank_Ocean_Endless__538x370Frank Ocean in a still from Endless (Video still via Boys Don't Cry)

In my opinion, the argument that Frank Ocean wasn't covered enough is nuts. I saw him mentioned on the biggest (bigger 'n' mine, and I covered him several times) gay blogs. If he wasn't covered more, I would chalk that up to a lot of things other than gay blogs being racist or somehow unsupportive of out gay artists.

First, the blogs at my level and below, we are not making any f*cking money. We are putting stuff up for the sheer pleasure of it, and that means we are not necessarily treating our blogs as being all things to all people. So there are going to be holes. For example, I don't like R&B music. I don't like rap. I don't like tattoo culture. I don't drink, smoke or do drugs—yes, even marijuana. I'm not the most fashionable guy alive. I'm also frickin' old, so that colors my tastes. I'm not sure how many hours I am supposed to spend as a public service, but I spend plenty and am not willing to spend more. So whatever crosses my path and interests me and will get clicks or will please me is what goes up.

Don't like it, look elsewhere or sacrifice your own time and money and do your own damn blog. 

Or go to work for the website and social media of a giant magazine owned by a giant corporation where you can get paid (something) to be a snarky bitch.

Second, Frank Ocean is seen as a great artist. People are dying for his music, and his sales strategy is unique and is newsworthy (which I have posted about). However, a stream of Frank Ocean stories is not possible because he does not put himself out there like many other artists do, so there is less of an interest in his persona. He isn't selling his sexuality (by which I don't mean his sexual orientation; but that, either), so he is not going to be as clickable. Does that mean he shouldn't be covered at all? Hell, no. But he is not going to be as widely covered as artists whose personae are driving popular culture, and it might even mean he will be less covered than some artists who have not much else going for them but their sexiness.

Sexy = clicks, and sexy is not a bad thing. It's the drumbeat beneath a lot of what makes the world go 'round.

Third, Frank Ocean is a huge, f*cking star. He is not—unlike some artists—beholden to gay blogs. He has his choice of media outlets, and he doesn't seem to engage many of them. That works for him. He is hot-hot-hot, and being less available is part of what helped make his new music so anticipated. What is a gay blog supposed to cover about him, other than an album review (I don't do those—I like doing those, but I have no time, and I certainly was never sent his album to listen to and cover) and the news of his success?

Short version: Frank Ocean is awesome, is a force, is a great stride forward for LGBTQ people, and deserves to be noticed. But in a time when non-corporate blogs make so little money and have to wrack their brains (or, in the case of many blogs you may think are run by committee, their brain), it's a little ridiculous to sneer at them/us for not covering any particular topics or artists enough. Call me to complain when I'm turning down requests for coverage by gay artists, because I often post gay artists, including total newcomers, and I have never been pitched Frank Ocean. (I'm not hurt. If I were Frank Ocean, I wouldn't be looking at my marketing plan and bemoaning the lack of a Boy Culture feature pitch.)

On the topic of pitching, I had a frustrating conversation with a millennial recently who kept saying he hates Nick Jonas. Why? Because of that speech at Stonewall, because he's gay-baiting. Gay-baiting, gay-baiting, gay-baiting.

You know what's offensive to me? When an artist does not like or care about LGBTQ people and tries to pander to us. That does not describe Nick or Joe Jonas, as I know from personal experience, and as anyone should know from checking out their history in a very anti-LGBTQ church and then their personal-epiphany paths toward speaking out positively about gay people. To me, when a public figure does that, that is positive, period. When a musician actively includes LGBTQ fans in his or her marketing strategy, that is a sign of respect, not a sign of contempt, and it's embarrassing when gay people repay this with jeers. It is cartoonish hipster to want equal rights but to question the motives of everyone who agrees with you.

The capper? The young guy I was talking to, who had such seething anger regarding LGBTQ issues and how we are being marketed to, sees Hillary and Trump as the same—and isn't registered to vote.

Easier to get mad about a sexy guy telling his young fans it's okay to be gay than to choose between a politician who is demonstrably and vocally pro-LGBTQ and one who is the opposite? And I'm supposed to be offended by the frequency with which cute Nick and cute Joe Jonas show up on gay blogs?

F*ck that.

 
Jul 19 2016
Happy 20,000th Post To VJBrendan.com! Comments (0)

Screen Shot 2016-07-19 at 5.20.26 PM(Image via VJBrendan.com)

Happy 20,000th post to VJBrendan.com—he always knows where the (good) bodies are buried!

 


Ads by Gay Ad Network

TWITTER FEED