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1102 posts categorized "MOVIES"

Oct 26 2016
HEAT INDEX — Hugh Jackman + Justin Timberlake + Garrett Magee + Body Parts + Pietro Boselli + Nico Tortorella + Atlas Gant + Chris Hemsworth + Stuart Martin + Built! Comments (0)

Logan(Image via James Mangold)

JUST HUGH & ME, KID: Jackman looks scarry-good in Logan shot.

JAILBAIT: Timberlake even looks adorbs breaking the law.

HE ACCUSED: Garrett Magee jokes about being gang-raped. It's funny 'cuz it's ...?


You can guess what happened next. 👨🏻🔫🔧

A video posted by Garrett Magee 👨🏻 (@gmagee03) on


PARTS IS PARTS: Amazing chest, bursting-free booty & bedroom beard!

HIS THIGHS? ADORED THEM: Pietro Boselli's tux strip.

Screen Shot 2016-10-26 at 10.52.01 AMNico says women are tougher to date. So go easy on me, big boy. (Video still via Access Hollywood Live)

WHAT YOU WANT WHEN YOU WANT: Nico Tortorella on sexual fluidity.

ATLAS GANT'S BARE BUTT: Endless loop. (Work Unfriendly)

ARE YOU HEMSWORTHY?: Calm down, Chris's hot ass is still married.

Frank-hat-mirror1Stuart Martinizing (Image via IndieGoGo)

WORK OF ART: Brit's butt on Italian TV. (Work Unfriendly)

ARCHITECTURE STUDENT: Built to last ... 


🙈💭[[ D R E A M I N G ]] 💭🙈 of summer already • #sweetdreams

A photo posted by ⠀⠀🇺🇸 Sid Garabato 🐻 beard (@sidgarabato) on

Oct 25 2016
Death Of The Party Comments (0)

I'm usually on top of major and minor celebrity passings, but I have been lax, hence this little catch-up:

PATRICIA BARRY: Early-TV actress and soap star Patricia Barry died at 94 (some say 93) mid-month and I totally Screen-capture-10missed it, even though I've been fixated on her presence on my list of the Greatest Living Stars 80 & Over. She was a captivatingly patrician presence on episodic TV, memorabily The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, and in film.

KATHRYN ADAMS: Kathryn Adams, an original cast member of the 1939 classic The Hunchback of Notre Dame as well as a Hitchcock player, died at 96 on October 14. Though she appeared in Kathryn-adams-1-sizedHunchback, she almost had the lead—until Charles Laughton insisted on Maureen O'Hara. O'Hara also just recent died in her nineties. (My list of surviving Hitchock leading ladies is here.)

TOM HAYDEN: Finally, anti-war icon Tom Hayden died yesterday at 76. Hayden was married to Jane Fonda at the height of his notoriety, and in spite of being scorned as a radical, served for many years in the California Senate.

BOBBY VEE: Fifties teen idol Bobby Vee died at 73 yesterday after battling Alzheimer's disease. His final performance was in 2011, not long after his diagnosis.

Oct 21 2016
6-PACK — Cher Madness + Meet NIKO + Garrett Clayton's Browser History + Democratic Wave? + Gun-Totin' Gays For Trump + Fresh Beats + Comments (0)

Screen Shot 2016-10-21 at 11.52.56 AM(Video still via The Late Late Show with James Corden)

*widget boy culture

Funny & Cher: James Corden and Cher offer “I Got You Bae.” After the jump!

NIKO-512A song in his art (Image via Randy Report)

*widget boy cultureYou gotta meet out artist NIKO!

*widget boy cultureGarrett Clayton admits to watching Brent Corrigan's first movie—made as a minor—online.

*widget boy cultureDemocrats killing it in early voting. Fingers crossed for 18 or so days.

*widget boy cultureClick here to be pissed off by some unrepentant gays for Trump, who unironically just got engaged.

Screen Shot 2016-10-21 at 11.58.23 AMUtter idiots (Video still via WSJ)

*widget boy cultureSurprise new Brett Gleason EP!

Unnamed(Image via Brett Gleason)

 Keep reading for Corden & Cher ...

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Teen Breach Movie: A Review Of KING COBRA & Inside The NYC Premiere Comments (0)

DSC00732Christian Slater and writer/director Justin Kelly (Image by Matthew Rettenmund)

Last night was the NYC premiere of the skin-soaked thriller King Cobra, writer/director Justin Kelly's take on the gruesome 2007 murder of porn impresario Bryan Kocis at the hands of rivals Joe Kerekes and Harlow Cuadra, all over the right to use then-newcummer Brent Corrigan in a video.

DSC00736 editHunting Season's Jake Manabat, Marc Sinoway & Tyler French (Image by Matthew Rettenmund)

DSC00734Sinoway, Misha Osherovich, yours truly & Andrew Glaszek (Image courtesy of Matthew Rettenmund)

The premiere, at IFC Center, attracted Kelly; Christian Slater (who stars as Kocis); Younger star Nico Tortorella (whose sexual orientation would make a great thriller in its own right, IMO); Hunting Season stars Marc Sinoway, Jake Manabat and Tyler French; History actor Misha Osherovich; photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders; Undetectable and Hustling actor Andrew Glaszek (who years from now will be known as the “It” ginger of NYC); and more.

Following the screening and a lively Q&A (somebody asked Slater if he would try gay porn if he could start his career over), the after-party was held at the Cock, a dive bar that even other dive bars would sneak into to avoid being seen. Which Unnamed means it's tacky, sleazy fun.

Hey, it wasn't the first time in history a star and his director left a screening and headed straight for Cock.

It was great to connect with the other attendees (no, not a euphemism), and to congratulate Slater on a fine performance. I also shook hands with Kelly after having been a disembodied voice on an intercom during a recent Q&A session with the gay media. (Coming.) I fear he hates me because I asked him why he's attracted to non-rah! rah! gay subject matter, considering the fact that King Cobra follows his debut, 2015's I Am Michael, about the XY publisher who went from gay activist to ex-gay activist. It was meant as a compliment.

I wish I could be more complimentary about his earnest King Cobra, but the film is uneven and, like Kocsis, fatally flawed. Then again, like Corrigan, it has an undeniable watchability.

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Oct 20 2016
Bitchy New KING COBRA Scene Comments (0)

Unnamed(Image via IFC)

King Cobra, Justin Kelly's long-awaited, seedy thriller about the men (James Franco, Keegan Allen) who murdered a rival (Christian Slater) over Brent Corrigan (Garrett Kelly), releases tomorrow, Friday.

In advance of the film's bow, check out this scene to see if it tempts your tummy with the taste of nuts and money.

Garrett Clayton Won't Tell You What He Does In His Bedroom Every Day (Nobody Asked Ya!) Comments (0)

Garrett-clayton-2(GIF via Disney Channel)

More disappointing language from Garrett Clayton, star of King Cobra, on his decision not to comment on his sexual orientation.

In a Q&A with Chris Azzopardi of PrideSource, Clayton—and I chalk some of this up to his youth—equates gayness with the stuff we do in our bedrooms:

I mean, they probably would feel a lot differently if people were calling them and saying, “So tell me: What you do in your bedroom every day?” This is my job. And I'm happy to promote my work. And I'm happy to stand up for things I believe in. If people can't see the positivity in that, then I think that's up to them. You can have Mother Teresa giving food out and somebody will find something negative to say.

I continue to argue: We know Robert De Niro likes chicks—what's so special about gay actors that their sexual orientations should be sacrosanct? Only homophobia benefits from that particular veil.

Read the rest of his articulate but, IMO, flawed arguments on the topic at the link.

Clayton also expresses sympathy for sex workers, talks about his crash diet for his nudity-charged role in the movie and speaks at length about his comfort with being undressed in front of the camera vs. at home.

Oct 17 2016
Until Proven Innocent: A Review Of SOUTHWEST OF SALEM Comments (0)

Unnamed(Image via

I am sometimes embarrassed to tell a woman the name of my blog, usually resorting to, “It's Boy Culture ... but we love girls, too!”

I've never felt less attached to the name than when I was watching the new documentary Southwest of Salem, which details the heartbreaking case of four Latinas from San Antonio, Texas, whose lesbianism almost certainly led to their being imprisoned for heinous crimes they did not commit; their story was almost certainly made possible by good ol' boy culture.

DSC00728The four women with their lawyer (Image & video by Matthew Rettenmund)

The San Antonio Four—Elizabeth Ramirez, Kristie Mayhugh, Cassandra Rivera and Anna Vasquez—were a tight-knit group of friends who found themselves accused, in 1994, of gang-raping Ramirez's two young nieces. The girls told a wild tale of drug-fueled, Satanic-driven group sex, an expert testified that the girls' hymens were damaged and that's all their community and the local media needed to hear.

Convicted, Ramirez pulled over 37 years and her friends each received 16. Only problem is, they didn't do it, and the crime for which they were convicted almost beyond a doubt never happened in the first place.

When one of the girls accusing the women grew up and found she could not remember anything negative happening at all, she confronted her father, a man with plenty of reason to have an ax to grind when it came to his sister-in-law. He allegedly threatened her with taking her children away if she refused to stay silent. She went on the record anyway, and he did try, unsuccessfully, to meddle with her custody.

Her admission led to Vasquez's parole, and Vasquez made it her mission to help her fellow accused. Their long, torturous struggle makes up Southwest of Salem.

Director Deborah S. Esquenazi has turned in a sobering, no-frills documentary that painstakingly details the case, which has yet to fully resolve; the women are currently free, but as the film shows, they are still fighting for justice.

Esquenazi documents how the expert testimony in the original case was not only flimsy, but later disavowed by the same expert who gave it; how the police seemed all too eager to lump the crime in with the last gasp of the now totally debunked Satanic ritual abuse epidemic (the film's only arty flourish is a sequence of footage from the Silent Era that eerily communicates the accusers' over-the-top fabulism); and how the legal system is set up to keep admissions of error extremely hard to solicit, let alone receive.

Most impressively, the director accomplishes this while telling the very human stories of the women, and of the accuser who set out to make things right years later.

She also deftly touches on the role (or lack thereof) of the nascent San Antonio gay community back in the '90s when the case first achieved notoriety, and on the roles of Catholicism and family in the women's lives.

Portions of the Q&A from the screening I attended:

There are many deeply moving sequences in Southwest of Salem—which has no shortage of parallels from which to draw in comparing the Massachusetts witch hunts of the 1600s with the way POC and LGBTQ people are still routinely treated by the U.S. justice system—including scenes of despair and of joy long withheld. For me, the most compelling scene is when an elderly, white, male, Texan judge is tasked with deciding whether a case he himself presided over may have gotten it wrong. One question he asks will chill you to the bone, and should lead any right-minded citizen to ask a dozen more questions about the efficacy of our system.

Don't miss this important film—check out its official site here and donate to the women's cause here.

Oct 16 2016
Singin' Through The Pain: A Review Of BRIGHT LIGHTS Comments (0)

4777060_orig(Image via HBO)

You may think you learned all you needed to know about the mother/daughter relationship of Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher when you saw Shirley MacLaine and Meryl Streep play them in the film adaptation of Fisher's roman à clef Postcards from the Edge (1990)—but that's only part of the story.

DSC00721Fisher with her dog, Gary, at the NYFF (Image by Matthew Rettenmund)

That's a really juicy part of the story, but still, only part of it.

Since then, Fisher—who has gotten her bipolar disorder under control—has been a devoted caretaker, best friend and immediate neighbor to her mom, one of the last survivors from Hollywood's Golden Age, and their whacky, tempestuous, deeply loving relationship is captured in all its gory glory in Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher & Debbie Reynolds, which screened October 10 at the New York Film Festival in NYC.

The film, directed by Alexis Bloom and Fisher Stevens, bravely and honestly follows what appears to be the twilight of 84-year-old Reynolds' time as a star, as a working performer and on earth.

Though she seemed as sharp as a tack and as spunky as ever when I saw her four years ago at the Cinecon film fest, she was visibly diminished accepting her SAG Award in 2015, a process captured in heart-stopping detail in Bright Lights.

Now, Reynolds seems to be almost 100% retired, and it's certainly against her will. Fisher—who says many poignant and thought-provoking things in the documentary—sums up why her mother's journey is so interesting to us all, pointing out that, “Age is hard for all of us, but she falls from a greater height,” something that's true of any great star, great beauty, greatly physical performer.

Fisher and her brother, Todd Fisher, display complete love and clear-eyed understanding of their superstar mom, who is both genuinely sweet and genuinly smitten with stardom, battling forces that led to a successful career but family strife in the past, and above all, all three of them approach themselves and their situations with admirable and infectious humor.

What can you say about these people whose family unit was torn asunder by Elizabeth Taylor—who ran off with Reynolds's husband Eddie Fisher (who appears in the film on his deathbed)—and yet who seem to reference her on a daily basis? Reynolds owned many of La Liz's most famous movie costumes, Todd Fisher has a Cleopatra poster hanging in his house.

When Bright Lights airs on HBO later this year, you'll undoubtedly find yourself more impressed than ever by Fisher's wit and grit (and her singing voice), and by Debbie's determination to remain as optimistic as her body will allow.

Just an absolutely touching and enthralling piece of work—which could also be said of the people in it.

After the jump, Debbie filmed this year for her Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Oscar ...

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