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Feb 08 2016
WIN IT: Funny New Movie PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL MONOGAMIST Comments (0)

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Here's your chance to win the funny new movie Portrait of a Serial Monogamist from Wolfe Video!

To enter (U.S. only), comment this post with your favorite lesbian-themed movie of all time. I'll pick 5 of you at random 1 week from tonight at 5 p.m. ET. Good luck!

From a press release:

Smart, successful, and charming, Elsie is a fortysomething Toronto TV producer who is the nice Jewish girl your mother warned you about: the self-proclaimed serial monogamist who seems to have slept with everyone in town. When Elsie breaks up with her long-term girlfriend, her friends challenge her to stay single for five months. When gorgeous DJ Lolli enters her life, things get complicated as Elsie faces her mother's disapproval, conflicting advice from friends, and the nagging suspicion that she may have made a big mistake.

With biting asides and street-smart comedic timing, Emmy-nominated actress / writer Diane Flacks (Kids In The Hall) proves a sexy and magnetic leading lady, demonstrating to audiences why girls keep risking their sanity for a woman all too happy to steal kisses and break hearts. Made by and starring top performers and talents of Toronto's vibrant comedy scene, the ensemble cast also includes Vag Halen lead singer/actress Vanessa Dunn as Lolli, Carolyn Taylor (Queer as Folk) and and a scene stealing supporting role from comedian Sabrina Jalees (writer on NBC's upcoming sitcom Crowded!). Co-directors / writers Christina Zeidler and John Mitchell have created an assured and fresh comedic feature film debut.

Set in the bohemian Parkdale neighborhood in Toronto, PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL MONOGAMIST invites audiences to peek behind the curtain into a world of smart, funny and relatable queer characters, dealing with the universal complications of modern relationships.

The film debuts February 9 across all digital platforms, including iTunes, Vimeo On Demand, and WolfeOnDemand.com, and will also be available same date on DVD via Wolfe Video and many major retailers. Also playing theatrically in Los Angeles at the Arena Cinema starting January 22.

Keep reading to watch the trailer ...

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Feb 07 2016
Lie Down, Sir: Revisiting MAURICE 30 Years After It Was Filmed Comments (0)

DSC06487James Ivory (L) & Pierre Lhomme (R) before a screening of Maurice (Image by Matthew Rettenmund)

Earlier this week, I was excited to attend one screening that was a part the FIAF (French Institute Alliance Française) series Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 4.54.13 PMCinéSalon: Lhomme Behind the Camera, which is running through February 23 at Florence Gould Hall (55 E. 59th St., NYC).

The series honors French cinematographer Pierre Lhomme, 85, whose work on a variety of classics and interesting efforts is said to have “helped shape the careers of iconic directors, including Chris Marker, Jean-Pierre Melville and James Ivory.”

Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 4.02.35 PMSample of three posters for the film; I had the middle one on my wall in collage. (Images via Cinecom)

The event that I was lucky enough to take in was a screening of the 1987 Merchant-Ivory film Maurice (pronounced Morris)a lushly romantic adaptation of the 1913 gay-themed novel by E.M. Forster that was not published until 1971, due to concerns that its subject matter could be ruled obscene.

Not only was Lhomme present, but director James Ivory, 87, also appeared to briefly introduce the film and then take part in a Q&A after, which I wouldn't have missed.

Tumblr_ngd0utOU4W1u01g6zo5_1280James Wilby as Maurice, the cat at the center of Forster's great gay love story (Image via Cinecom)

When I was in college at the University of Chicago—a school I attended in large part because I randomly found a queer students' union flyer when I went to visit, not even focusing on the school's reputation for academics—I had a job with a literary agent in the Fine Arts Building downtown. Maurice played that quaint venue, and I knew I could not miss it, even -I-love-you-maurice-1987-13009433-720-406though it would mark the first time I saw a gay movie in public. I remember being scared to death buying the ticket, and then sitting in the theater, wondering if a man would try to grab my knee or something, and wondering if I might be recognized. (I was out to some high school friends back home, but almost no one on campus quite yet.)

I couldn't have asked for a more beautiful film to see in that phase of my life. I appreciated the unrepentant emotionality of Maurice (James Wilby) and Clive (Hugh Grant), as well as the cautionary aspect of Clive's retreat into the closet. Most uplifting to me was the film's happy ending, in which the upper-class Maurice finds passion and—just maybe—eternal happiness with a working-class stiff (Rupert Graves). As I told Mr. Ivory after the screening, the movie represented to me a true gay love story, and also a cautionary tale, but one that dealt with very contemporary issues (coming out) and did not feature characters who had to be punished for their alleged sins.

At the time, Roger Ebert begrudgingly gave the film three stars, but noted:

Maurice tells the story of a young English homosexual who falls in love with two completely different men, and in their differences is the whole message of the movie, a message I do not agree with. Yet because the film is so well made and acted, because it captures its period so meticulously, I enjoyed it even in disagreement ... The problem in the movie is with the gulf between his romantic choices. His first great love, Clive, is a person with whom he has a great deal in common. They share minds as well as bodies. Scudder, the gamekeeper, is frankly portrayed as an unpolished working-class lad, handsome but simple. In the England of 1914, with its rigid class divisions, the two men would have had even less in common than the movie makes it seem, and the real reason their relationship is daring is not because of sexuality but because of class. Apart from their sexuality, they have nothing of substance to talk about with each other in this movie. No matter how deep their love, I suspect that within a few weeks or months the British class system would have driven them apart.

Okay, well, what about 1990's Pretty Woman, a piece of fluff about a rich CEO falling for a streetwalking prostitute? Ebert gave it a far more enthusiastic three-and-a-half-star write-up. What about the characters' differences? Well:

He offers her money to spend one week with him, she accepts, he buys her clothes, they have sex and of course (this being the movies) they fall in love. They fall into a particularly romantic kind of love, the sort you hardly see in the movies these days - a love based on staying awake after the lights are out and confiding autobiographical secrets ... There could indeed be, I suppose, an entirely different movie made from the same material —a more realistic film, in which the cold economic realities of the lives of both characters would make it unlikely they could stay together ... But by the end of the movie I was happy to have it close as it does.

Yeah, so gays can't get one happy ending, but straights could, back then, get them every single time without a raised eyebrow. Perfect. (Decades later, Maurice is the better-reviewed and better-respected of the two films—91% on Rotten Tomatoes with 87% audience approval—even if Pretty Woman62%/68%—is an immortal piece of pop culture because one of the leads had a vagina.)

10168980724_6eb461c4e6_bHugh Grant has had a very good hair life. (Image via Cinecom)

Watching it again 29 years later was moving in that I remembered so many scenes as if I'd seen the film a thousand times (just once). Even the music was a strong sense-memory—I had bought the album and listened to it over and over. It's an exquisite, evocative score by the late Richard Robbins, who did many of the Merchant-Ivory films, and who passed away in 2012. It was a treat to relive this experience, and I must say my fetishization of Hugh Grant's hair in this film (he isn't really high on my list of crushes anymore) and of every inch of Rupert Graves (he is) remains intact.

Afterward, Ivory and Lhomme took questions from the audience, some intelligent and some head-scratchers, including a long one from a woman who wanted to know if the actors were gay (!) and if the director had cast beautiful men as a comment on gay narcissism (gay!!!).

Two things that irked me: The woman next to me made a comment that my camera was making too much noise (it makes a very faint electronic whir when it turns on) before the film even started, and yet she wound up being the culprit when a wind-chime alarm blared throughout the last five full minutes of the movie. She also kept asking me to confirm what the subjects had said during the interview, even though I was clearly videoing everything.

Tumblr_inline_mkqgzjX3LH1qz4rgpScudder, off to London to get his (gentle)man. (Image via Cinecom)

The other bummer was that the very last question ended with a statement that Graves's character Scudder was “possibly the worst person alive.” I was blown away by this assertion, as was I think Ivory, who didn't address it.

I asked the questioner afterward what he meant. “Oh, are you a Scudder apologist?” he asked me. Gee, I don't really think Scudder needs apologies made for him. Anyway, the younger guy asserted that he and all of his reading group all hated Scudder. Apparently, the segment in which Scudder—who had hoped to make love with Maurice again but found himself ignored—bluffed that he might blackmail his lover made this guy think Scudder was evil and manipulative. To me, it seemed baldly obvious that the intent of the author and the director was to show that Scudder genuinely loved Maurice and was extremely insecure when rejected. He specifically, warm-heartedly folds when pushed by Maurice, and explains he'd never take a penny from him.

Tumblr_mk5lk1XDN51r2e74go8_500RupertGraves05They were there, they were queer, they got used to it. (Images via Cinecom)

Scudder risked his security by coming to have sex with Maurice the first time, then he gave up his security in the Argentines (as well as contact with his family) to spend what we hope will be the rest of his life with the guy. Putting aside how sexy Scudder is (check out this scorching montage of love scenes), he is nuts for Maurice,  and he represents the non-judgmental self-actualization that Maurice needs and embraces, in stark contrast to the life of lies and self-denial that Clive has slid into and advocates. If Scudder is the worst person ever, what is Clive? It just seems to me that it's an accepted observation that Maurice was written by Forster explicitly to be a gay love story with a happy ending. If Maurice ends up with Scudder and it's supposed to be a happy ending, I have to believe Scudder is not supposed to be an unpleasant drama queen.

Tumblr_lq5lroluFz1qa22qso1_500Theirs was a love that dared speak its name. (Image via Cinecom)

It was an interesting exchange, but one of those times when you not only have an impression you feel strongly, but your impression fits with the only possibly explanation of an artist's work. I will say that the ending has some room for interpretation in that we can't be sure the men will be happy always. Ivory mentioned to me that one complicating factor would be World War I, but he also said it was, indeed, supposed to be a happy ending.

032_hugh_grant_theredlistOh, Mr. Graaant! (Image via Cinecom)

Check out the my video, containing most of the answers and comments from Ivory and Lhomme, after the jump ...

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Feb 04 2016
DADDY Issued ... In April Comments (0)

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Here comes Gerald McCullouch's Daddy!

More info after the jump ...

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Feb 03 2016
12-PACK— Daley Dose + Gay Generation Gap + Gaga Is Everything, Everywhere + Des-Lusions Of Grandeur In Iowa + Trump Meltdown + Secret History + MORE! Comments (0)
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Tom Daley GIF from The Gaily Grind

*widget boy cultureTom Daley on your protein intake.

*widget boy cultureDavey Wavey trashes ageism, gay writer trashes him personally in response.

*widget boy cultureMuscles? Check. Beard? Check. Drunk? Working on it.

*widget boy cultureMANAGER OF THE YEAR: Gaga will salute Bowie, belt the national anthem.

*widget boy cultureElizabeth Banks will play Rita Repulsa!

*widget boy cultureCaitlyn Jenner tried to transition 30 years ago, grew breasts, stopped.

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*widget boy cultureNY school system now has an LGBT liaison.

*widget boy cultureSome Repubs & Bernie supporters believe coin-toss smear; Sanders won't concede.

*widget boy cultureTrump also has a problem with reality—cries fraud!

*widget boy cultureRand Paul realizes nobody wants him running an organization he despises.

*widget boy cultureChristian singer's account of Oregon militant's death is discredited.

*widget boy cultureBlack, gay life in the military. MANY cool photos here.

Screen Shot 2016-02-03 at 12.00.56 PMImage via First Gay Reich

 
Feb 02 2016
Sundance Film Festival Report: Best To Worst Comments (0)

03391016ceb5a9c4b06c5dc32ced6ad884951e9eHoly Hell image via Sundance Film Festival

Once you've checked out Variety's picks for the best, check out the annual Sundance Film Festival recap offered by my pal Dan. I always appreciate his insights ...

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Feb 01 2016
WIN IT: New Movie HOW TO WIN AT CHECKERS (EVERY TIME) Comments (0)

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Win the new movie How to Win at Checkers (Every Time) by Josh Kim from Wolfe Video on DVD!

To enter (U.S. only), just comment this post with your choice for your favorite movie or TV show about siblings. I'll pick 5 of you at random to win 1 week from tonight at 5 p.m. ET. Good luck!

From a press release:

Superstar Thai actor-model Toni Rakkaen headlines this striking debut feature from Korean-American writer-director Josh Kim. As the now grown Oat, he recalls his childhood experience of trying to rescue his gay older brother Ek from being drafted into military service. As Ek grapples with the gritty realities of life in Bangkok - working at a bar for male hustlers and sex-workers - he has also found love with his more privileged boyfriend Jai. When the moment of truth arrives with the draft lottery these 21-year-olds must draw either a black or a red slip to possibly be conscripted into the armed forces. Who will be sent off to the service and who will get to stay home?

Told with an nuanced detail from the younger brother's point of view, this drama takes a refreshingly unadorned and impartial look at an essentially loving environment where social conditions are governed by corruption and false ideals. Based on the stories from the bestselling book Sightseeing by Rattawut Lapcharoensap, the film unfolds as a riveting dramatic portrayal of poverty and privilege, corruption and the compromises of growing up in contemporary Thailand.

HOW TO WIN AT CHECKERS (EVERY TIME) also features stellar performances from Ingkarat "Ryu" Damrongsakkulas as the 11 year-old Oat and Natarat Lakha "Nut" as irrepressible trans woman Kitty. The film is writer/director Josh Kim's debut feature film, and was produced by Hollywood veteran Chris Lee (Superman Returns, SWAT, Valkryie), Edward Gunawan, and Anocha Suwichakornpong.

The film debuts February 2 across all digital platforms, including iTunes, Vimeo On Demand, and WolfeOnDemand.com, and will also be available same date on DVD via Wolfe Video and many major retailers.

Keep reading to watch the trailer ...

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Jan 29 2016
French New Wave Film Auteur Jacques Rivette Dies @ 87 Comments (0)

Celine-and-julie-go-boatingStill from Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974)

Jacques Rivette, the French New Wave film director noted for chic productions with constitution-challenging running times (one ran 760 minutes), has died at 87 after battling Alzheimer's disease.

Among his 20 features are Paris Belongs to Us (1961), Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974) and La Belle Noiseuse (1991).  

 
Jan 28 2016
Howard's End: A Nephew Documents His Uncle's Artistic Journey Comments (0)

Still from Uncle Howard

Fans of Madonna are just about the only people who have caught the underrated film Bloodhounds of Broadway (1989), directed by Howard Brookner. Brookner, who had made a name for himself with his William S. Burroughs doc Burroughs: The Movie (1983), wrote the fun, frothy '20s flick with Colman deKay, and wound up attracting one of the best, most diverse casts of the '80s—along with Madonna, the film features Matt Dillon, Randy Quaid, Jennifer Grey, Anita Morris, Rutger Hauer, Julie Hagerty, Dinah Manoff, Alan Ruck, Esai 12540845_756981177765264_6707135659366426462_nMorales and more.

Though the film bombed at the box office with, for the most part, with critics, it remains a pleasing piece, albeit one badly re-cut after Brookner died of AIDS.

Now playing at the Sundance Film Festival is another Brookner creation, directed by another Brookner—Howard's nephew Aaron is the man behind Uncle Howard, and (Queerty's) Jeremy Kinser turns in an insightful Q&A with the filmmaker at Sundance.org.

Madonna and Jennifer Grey perform in a still from Bloodhounds of Broadway.

Money quote:

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